Affiliated COMM Faculty

Dale Hample

Dale Hample

Dale Hample (Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1975) specializes in interpersonal arguing, persuasion, conflict management, and interpersonal communication. Among his recent projects are an investigation of emotional support messages to HIV survivors (with Ling Na), a study of reasoning in response to persuasive messages about binge drinking (with Adam Richards), and the effects of evidence quality, intrinsic credibility, and scientific jargon on reception of messages about several health topics (with Jessica Hample).

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Sahar Mohamed KhamisSahar Mohamed Khamis

Sahar Khamis is an assistant professor in the department of communication and an affiliate faculty with the department of women’s studies and the consortium on race, gender and ethnicity at the University of Maryland. Dr. Khamis holds a Ph.D. in mass media and cultural studies from the University of Manchester in England. The title of her Ph.D. was: “Egyptian rural women, television and public awareness programs.” It was based on an in-depth ethnographic audience study that analyzed women’s patterns of media reception and interpretation of governmental family planning, literacy and health awareness campaigns. Dr. Khamis conducted a series of longitudinal ethnographic follow-up studies in the same research site in rural Egypt over a number of years to detect the impact of social, political and communication developments on women’s reactions to these issues. These studies resulted in a series of publications including a chapter titled: “Multiple literacies, multiple identities: Egyptian rural women’s readings of televised literacy campaigns” in the book "Women and Media in the Middle East: Power through Self-Expression", edited by Naomi Sakr and published by I.B. Tauris, London in 2004; an article titled: “Multiple meanings, identities, and resistances: Egyptian rural women’s readings of televised family planning campaigns”, which was published in the International Journal of Communication in 2009; and an article titled: “New media and social change in rural Egypt”, which was published in the journal Arab Media & Society in 2010.

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Brooke LiuBrooke Liu

Dr. Brooke Liu's research investigates how effective risk and crisis communication can optimally prepare the public to respond to and recover from disasters. In recent years, her research has focused on the unique roles that governments’ social/new media can play in building community resilience. Her quantitative and qualitative research has been published in the field’s leading journals such as Communication Research, the Journal of Applied Communication Research, and the Journal of Public Relations Research. Dr. Liu’s research has been funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Defense (DOD), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Plank Center for Leadership in Public Relations, and the Arthur W. Page Center for Integrity in Public Communication. Dr. Liu serves on the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Risk Communication Advisory Committee and directs the Risk Communication and Resilience Research Program at the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), a DHS Center of Excellence.

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Anita Atwell SeateAnita Atwell Seate

Anita Atwell Seate (Ph.D., University of Arizona) researches in the areas of intergroup/intercultural communication. Specifically, her research is animated by questions about how people’s identity as members of various social group impacts communication processes. She studies a variety of social groups including identities based race, ethnicity, age, gender, and sexual orientation, with an emphasis place on racial and ethnic groups. With regards to risk communication, her research examines how identity-based social issues, such as immigration, are presented in the news media and how these portrayals influence people’s policy decision making.

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Leah WaksLeah Waks

Leah Waks (Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1991) is a Senior Lecturer and Director of the Undergraduate Studies Program in Communication at the University of Maryland. Her main interest is in studying the interplay of cognitions, attitudes, and emotions in decision making in the areas of conflict management and health. She also studies the impact of media messages and culture on decision making approaches. Her current research includes studying the influence of media content on individuals' attitudes and decision making. Her latest research includes analysis of HPV vaccine coverage on YouTube and a content analysis of HPV vaccine information online.

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Amber Westcott-BakerAmber Westcott-Baker

Dr. Westcott-Baker is a scholar of communication with primary emphases in cognitive science and quantitative methods in social sciences. She has a B.A. degree in Psychology and Film Studies from the University of Colorado and an M.A. from New York University in Cinemwesa Studies. Her Ph.D. is in Communication from the University of California-Santa Barbara where she completed a dissertation entitled Dynamics of Persuasion in Public Service Announcements. Her research has appeared in Communication Theory and the Journal of Media Law and Ethics. She is also the co-author of a study on public service announcements published in Communication Monographs.

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Andrew WolvinAndrew D. Wolvin

Andrew D. Wolvin (Ph.D., Purdue University, 1968) works in the communication areas of listening behavior and communication management. His current research interests extend dimensions of listening to the health literacy model and to a narrative model of listening to stories. A widely-published communication scholar, his recent work includes an edited book, Listening and Human Communication in the 21st Century (Blackwell), and a co-authored text, Communicating: A Social, Career, and Cultural Focus (12th edition, Allyn & Bacon). Professor Wolvin applies his work in listening behavior to the development of a model of “listenability,” preparing briefers in the national intelligence community.

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